ACL CENTENNIAL INSTITUTE 

NEW YORK CITY EXCURSIONS

WEDNESDAY JUNE 26, 2019

Exact times and locations will be supplied closer to the event.  

Full Day Excursion

Participants who select this option will not be able to register for half-day excursions. 

Greek Utopias at the World's Fairs: Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens Museum, Greek Astoria
Dr. Jerise Fogel, Montclair State University, Guide

Queens is one of the less-explored boroughs of New York City for tourists, yet it is home to some incredible history and culture. We will see Flushing Meadows’ World’s Fair Exhibition Grounds and Queens Museum, part of the NYC Parks system, first created to house the 1939 World’s Fair, and later also the 1964 World’s Fair and its famous Unisphere. Our walking tour will center on the Fair exhibits and include the Unisphere and a guided tour of the Queens Museum, as well as a slide lecture if possible; we’ll also lunch at a Greek restaurant in Astoria.
1. Trylon, Perisphere, Unisphere: 1939 and 1964’s inspirational “World of Tomorrow” based on the Greek scientific legacy 
2. The Greek Pavilion: a quasi-fascist utopia based on ancient Greece (Metaxas’ 1939 regime and its controversial exhibit)
3. Modern Greek culture in Queens: multi-cultural Queens and its local community histories, including those of Greek immigrants, today


 

HALF DAY EXCURSIONS
Particpants will be able to select one AM and one PM excursion.

AM EXCURSIONS 

Schedules will vary but most will last 2 hours, and conclude by 12:30 pm.


Myths at the Metropolitan Museum (Latine!)
John Young, Guide

Take a tour of the Metropolitan Museum in Latin. Encounter and discuss mythological scenes in the Greek and Roman galleries, the European Sculpture & Decorative Arts galleries, and the European Paintings 1250-1800 galleries.

The Titans of Rockefeller Center
 (Rockefeller Center walking tour)

Dr. Jared Simard, New York University, Guide

Come explore Rockefeller Center, famous for its Christmas Tree and Radio City Music Hall and the Rockettes. Less understood but no less conspicuous is the Center's deep engagement with Classics! From the statues of Prometheus and Atlas to the many allusions to the Roman past, this walking tour will discuss the many classical references in Rockefeller Center. Ultimately, the tour hopes to serve as a model for inspiring teachers to have their students engage with the classically-inspired material culture around them. Please wear comfy shoes and be prepared to be on your feet the whole time.

Classical New York: Discovering Greece & Rome on Wall Street
Dr. Matthew McGowan, Fordham University, Guide

Come explore the classical influence on New York’s most iconic buildings around Wall Street with Professor Matthew McGowan (Fordham), editor of Classical New York: Discovering Greece and Rome in Gotham. The tour will include Federal Hall, NY Stock Exchange, Trinity Church, & St. Paul’s. It will start at the stately Greek-revival St. Peter’s on Barclay Street, head to Broadway for visits to St. Paul’s and Trinity Church and then turn on to Wall Street to end at NY’s most famous Greek revival building, Federal Hall, and to offer an interpretation of the highly classicizing pedimental sculpture of the beaux-arts NY Stock Exchange itself.

Central Park from Sherman's Equestrian Statue to Cleopatra's Needle
    Ron Janoff, Guide

This tour will especially highlight sculpture in Central Park, including the zoo, and classical elements in Central Park and on 5th Avenue. We will explore the Zoo, the Mall, the bandshell, Bethesda Fountain, Bow Bridge, the ramble, the castle (weather station), the sailboat pond and Alice sculpture, the Frick Mansion/Museum, and Cleopatra's Needle.

 


PM EXCURSIONS

Most will begin around 2:00 pm.

Eromenoi and Hetairai: Sex and Sexuality in the Greek and Roman collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
Dr Andrew Lear,
PhD in Classics, UCLA; President, Oscar Wilde Tours

The sexual universe of Ancient Greece was very different from that of the modern West, and one of the best sources of information about it is Athenian vase-painting.  The Met has a splendid collection of vases, and one particularly rich in erotica of all kinds, with much pederastic courtship, many hetairai at symposia, and even images touching on less central issues, such as female-female love.  Add in a few relevant busts (including the Emperor Hadrian's boy toy Antinous), mosaics, figurines etc., and the Met's Greek and Roman collection provides a splendid introduction to Greek and Roman sexualities. Spend 2 hours exploring the collection with an expert on the intersection between Classical sexualities and art and designer of famous tours following issues of sex and gender in the Met's collection.

American Acropolis: Columbia University campus and Grant's Tomb National Monument
Ron Janoff, Guide

This walking tour will focus on the great classical buildings, motifs, and sculpture of the Columbia Univeristy Campus, and on the two presidents (Low and Butler) who created it, as well as the many notable classicists who have been faculty at Columbia; including the splendid interior of Low Library (McKim Meade and White). After that, we cross to Barnard College, and on to Grant's Tomb. Participants who wished could join our guide in an extra walk down to the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Riverside Park, magnificent on a late June afternoon; or go on their own to the Cathedral of St. John the Divine.

The Titans of Rockefeller Center - Repeated from the AM Excursions
 (Rockefeller Center walking tour)

Dr. Jared Simard, New York University, Guide

Come explore Rockefeller Center, famous for its Christmas Tree and Radio City Music Hall and the Rockettes. Less understood but no less conspicuous is the Center's deep engagement with Classics! From the statues of Prometheus and Atlas to the many allusions to the Roman past, this walking tour will discuss the many classical references in Rockefeller Center. Ultimately, the tour hopes to serve as a model for inspiring teachers to have their students engage with the classically-inspired material culture around them. Please wear comfy shoes and be prepared to be on your feet the whole time.

American Numismatic Society
Dr Lucia Carbone, Guide

The following are both part of the visit to the American Numismatic Society

                 Teaching Caesar & Vergil with Coins
 

The Roman historian Fergus Millar once stated that ‘coins are the most deliberate of all symbols of public identity’. For scholars of the Classical world (and not only), coins are the unsurpassed vectors of the self-representation for the elites. Because of their mass-produced nature and widespread circulation, they represent the privileged communication channel between elites and lower classes. The study of coins thus provides a first-hand and unmediated heuristic tool to understand Classical culture, an important complement to the literary approach often adopted in high school. This session aims to investigate the interaction between literary and non-literary (in this case numismatic) representations of the power of Caesar and Octavian Augustus. Closely comparing literary passages from Caesar’s Bellum Gallicum and Bellum Civile and Vergil’s Aeneid to contemporary coins, it intends to provide a wider perspective on the ways Caesar and Augustus presented their imperatorial power. At the same time, coins issued by their adversaries proposed different and alternative narratives, often obliterated in literary texts. Through first-hand access to the incomparable collection of the American Numismatic Society, rich of over 1,000,000 coins, the participants will appreciate the constant dialogue between literary text and numismatic sources, thus enhancing a more organic understanding of the cultural changes that took place in the momentous years of Caesar and Octavian Augustus.

               Coinage and Literature, two complementary approaches to Roman civilization
 

According to Cicero, in 240 BC Livius Andronicus, a Greek freedman from Tarentum, staged his first play in Rome, thus setting the official starting date of Latin Literature. Roughly in the same years, the city of Rome began the production of its own coinage, characterized by Greek-inspired silver coins and traditionally Italian bronze coins and bars. Both Latin literature and Roman coinage originated in the middle ground between Greek and Roman tradition that characterized the Archaic Age. Since their inception, literature and coinage thus represent two complementary and deeply interrelated heuristic tools to better understand Roman civilization, as they both represent the privileged vectors of the self-representation of the elites.
This session aims to present a survey of the diachronic development of Roman coinage from its beginnings in the Archaic Age to the Augustan saeculum, showing the connection to the contemporary developments of Roman literature. Through first-hand access to the incomparable collection of the American Numismatic Society, rich of over 1,000,000 coins, the participants will appreciate the constant dialogue between literary text and numismatic sources, thus enhancing a more organic understanding of the Roman civilization as a whole.

The American Classical League

860 NW Washington Boulevard | Suite A | Hamilton, OH 45013
Phone: 513-529-7741 | Fax: 513-529-7742